Divorce Attorney Cape Town

Latest Divorce Trends South Africa


divorce statistics

Divorce Trends in South Africa

According to the latest statistics issued by Stats SA there is a consistent decline in the number of people getting married in South Africa.

There has also been a decline in customary marriages, indicating a decrease of 12,5% from the previous year. Civil unions (Gay and Lesbian) registered in South Africa increased by 15,2%. These figures are indicative of the fact that less and less people are opting for marriage.

According to the latest data the crude divorce rate was 0,5 divorces per 1 000 estimated resident population. The number indicates an increase of 3,4% divorces from the previous year.

Reasons for Divorce

According to a survey on the Divorce Laws Website South Africans had stated that the following reasons were the main reasons for divorce:

  1. Lack of Communication 23.47%
  2. Adultery / Cheating 21.6%
  3. Abuse 11.99%
  4. Lack of Intimacy / Sex 10.86%
  5. Falling out of love 7.24%
  6. Finances 5.74%
  7. Addiction 4.87%
  8. Involvement of parents 3.37%
  9. Religious Differences 2.25%

Characteristics of plaintiffs

The website www.divorcelaws.co.za, South Africa’s premier resource on Divorce and Family Law attracted 465 420 unique visitors in South Africa during the period 1 August 2015 to 30 August 2016. It is interesting to note that over 60% of those visitors were female in comparison to 40% being male. Of these visitors 59.56% were from Gauteng, 21.70% were from the Western Cape, 11.29% were from KwaZulu-Natal, 3.15% were from the Eastern Cape, 1.17% were from the Free State, 1.12% were from North West, 0.98% were from Limpopo, 0.73% were from Mpumalanga and 0.25% were from the Northern Cape. Sandton, 20.59% seems to be the area from where most people requested information on divorce, maintenance, parental rights, custody, domestic violence and general family law, followed by Cape Town 20.56%, Pretoria 15.23%, Johannesburg 8.92%, Durban 6.91%, Centurion 3.01%, Roodepoort 2.84%, Port Elizabeth 1.85%, Krugersdorp 1.66% and Randburg 1.48%.

More wives 51,7% than husbands 34,4% initiated the divorce according to the latest data. With the exception of women from the black African population who had a lower proportion of plaintiffs 44,1%, the proportion of women plaintiffs from the other population groups was above 50,0%.

White population group 57,8%, coloured population group 56,9% and Indian/Asian population group 54,6% were women. However, it should also be noted that the black African population group had a much higher proportion of divorces with unspecified sex of the plaintiff 17,3%.

Population Groups

Couples from the white population group dominated the number of divorces until 2007 thereafter, the black African couples had the highest number of divorces up until 2014. In 2003, 40,0% of the divorcees were from the white population group whereas 24,3% came were from the black African population group. By 2014, 37,1% of the divorcees were from the black African population group and 28,2% from the white population group. The proportions of the divorcees from the coloured and the Indian/Asian population groups were quite constant during the twelve-year period. However, there was a prominent increase in the proportions of divorcees from the coloured population group (from 16,3% in 2013 to 20,2% in 2014) which may have affected the result. Generally, there was an increase in the proportion of divorces for black Africans and decline for white population group from 2003 to 2014.

Occupation of Plaintiffs

It is noted that a high proportion of the plaintiffs 28,2% of the men and 30,9% of the women did not indicate the type of occupation they were engaged in at the time of divorce. In addition, 15,2% and 22,1% of the men and women respectively were not economically active at the time of divorce.

 

Most plaintiffs were:

  • professional, semi-professionals and technical occupations 12,0%;
  • managers and administrators 9,3%; and
  • 9,2% in clerical and sales occupations.

Some differences were observed regarding the type of occupation of men and women. The men who initiated the divorce were largely managers and administrators 14,5% while the women were mainly in professional, semi-professionals and technical occupations 14,3%.

Number of times married

Results presented that divorce cases for both men and women were mainly from individuals who had married once. About 80,0% of divorces for men and women were from first-time marriages compared to 12,4% of men and 10,9% of women from second-time marriages. Around 2,0% of men and women were getting divorced for at least the third time.

Age at the time of divorce

The median ages at divorce were 43 years for men and 40 years for women, indicating that generally, men were older than women, with a difference of about three years. The pattern of median ages in 2014 by population group shows that black African and white men had the highest median age of 44 years while women from the other population group had the lowest median age 33 years. The difference in the median ages at the time of divorce for men and women was higher among the other population group (ten years) than among black African, coloured, Indian/Asian and white population groups. Although there were differences in the ages at which most men and women from the various population groups divorced, the age patterns were quite similar. The data revealed that there were fewer divorces among the younger less than 25 years old and the older (65 years and older) divorcees. For men, the peak age group at divorce was 40 to 44 for all population groups. In the case of women, the peak age group for coloured and white population groups was 40 to 44 and the black African and Indian/Asian was 35 to 39.

Duration of marriage of divorcing couples

Statistics from the annual divorce data do not give a comprehensive picture of the number of marriages ending in divorce. The largest number 27,3% of the divorces were for marriages that lasted between five and nine years. This group is followed by marriages that lasted between ten and fourteen years 18,7% and marriages that lasted for less than five years 18,4%. Thus 45,7% of the 24 689 divorces in 2014 were marriages that lasted for less than 10 years. According to results irrespective of the population group, the highest proportion of divorces occurred to couples who had been married for five to nine years. Thus 32,6% of divorces from the black African; 25,6% from both coloured and white; 24,4% from the Indian/Asian population groups were marriages that lasted between five and nine years. For the white population an equally high proportion 23,7% of divorces occurred in the first five years. Furthermore, for all population groups, after nine years of marriage, the proportion of divorces declined as the duration of marriage increased.

Divorces involving couples with minor children

In 2014, 13 676 55,4% of the 24 689 divorces had children younger than 18 years. The coloured and the white population groups had the highest 64,9 and the lowest 46,2% percentages respectively. The distribution of the number of children affected by divorce shows that 39,1% were from the black African population group; 24,9% from the coloured population group; 23,3% from the white population group and 5,6% from the Indian/Asian population group.

Source: http://voices.news24.com/bertus-preller/2016/09/latest-divorce-trends-south-africa/

 

Hiding assets in a divorce.


In a recent matter before the Supreme Court of Appeal in the case of DEB v MGB 2014 ZASCA 137, the court expressed its disapproval of parties in divorce proceedings who does not properly disclose their assets. The attitude of many husbands, particularly in relation to money claims where they control the money and assets, can be characterized as “catch me if you can”.

They set themselves up as immovable objects in the hopes that they will wear down the other party. They use every means to do so. They fail to discover and disclose properly, fail to provide any particulars of assets within their peculiar knowledge and generally delay and obfuscate in the hope that they will not be “caught” and have to disgorge what is in law due to the other party.

In this matter the husband clearly failed to comply with the provisions of s 7 of the Act. He delayed providing what were obviously relevant documents until the last minute and then did not discover them. He declined to provide any documents concerning the financial position of one of his businesses. He did not provide documents which could be used to trace assets derived from the excluded assets. He did not prove that documents relating to another business were furnished timeously or at all pursuant to a subpoena issued after initially claiming that he could not furnish these without the consent of his co-trustees. He inexplicably did not testify and then took a technical point concerning documentary proof.

The court stated that the approach of the husband deserved censure and may have warranted a punitive costs order at the trial.

In this matter the husband was ordered to pay the wife an amount of R 6.4 million and to transfer half of a loan account of approximately R 11 million to her. The husband was also ordered to pay the costs of the appeal.

Compiled by Bertus Preller – Family Law and Divorce Attorney

http://www.divorceattorney.co.za

Think before you get married


Political Marriage

The short-lived “marriage” between the DA’s Helen Zille and Agang SA’s Mamphela Ramphele might be old news for some but a marriage without the existence of an Antenuptial contract or “ANC” can have devastated consequences for the parties involved not only during the course of the marriage but also in the unlikely event of a divorce. Therefore if you do get married make sure your paperwork is in order before the big day otherwise the damage may be substantial. Unfortunately, as in the case in question parties focus so much on the marriage ceremony itself that they completely forget the implications of neglecting to make an informed decision regarding the marriage regime, in the unlikely event that they do divorce.

In accordance with the Matrimonial Property Act 88 of 1984, which came into operation on 1 November 1984, there are three forms of matrimonial property regimes in South Africa, namely:

Marriages in community of property
Marriages out of community of property without accrual
Marriages out of community of property with accrual

Marriages in community of property

Marriage in community of property is undoubtedly the cheapest and most popular form of all the matrimonial regimes, although deeply flawed. No ANC is required, so if you marry without an antenuptial contract, you will by default be married in community of property. In this form of marriage, the spouses’ estates (what they own/assets and any debt/liabilities) are joined together and each has the right of disposal over the assets; they are equal concurrent managers of the joint estate. Each has an undivided or indivisible half share of the joint or communal estate.

Advantages of marriage in community of property

You don’t have to enter into a special contract before being able to get married.
When you are the financially weaker spouse, you get to share in the assets of your spouse.

Disadvantages of marriage in community of property

When you are the economically stronger spouse, you have to share your assets with your spouse.
You are jointly liable for each other’s debts. This is particularly problematic on insolvency.
The joint administration of the estate is rather complicated.
When a marriage starts to fail, it can become difficult to obtain joint consent.

One of the most devastating consequences of a marriage in community of property is that when one spouse becomes insolvent (cannot pay his/her debts), both spouses will be declared insolvent, because there is one communal estate. If there is a court order against either one of the spouses, the communal estate can be lost.

The consequences of divorce when married in community of property

Upon divorce, the assets of the joint estate as at the date of divorce will be divided equally between the parties, unless a spouse claims forfeiture and the court grants such a forfeiture order.

Marriages out of community of property

This matrimonial property regime involves an ANC (i.e. an agreement entered into before the marriage) where community of property and profit and loss are excluded. There is no joining of the spouses’ estates into one joint estate. Each spouse has his/her own separate estate, consisting of his/her premarital assets and debts, and all the assets and debts he/she acquires during the marriage. They each administer their own separate estates and have full and exclusive control over their own property. By marrying out of community of property, the spouses choose to keep their estates separate and whatever assets and liabilities they individually had before the date of marriage will remain part of their separate estates. The spouses can, however, agree to include the accrual between them so that both spouses will share equally in the growth during the marriage of each other’s separate estates.

Antenuptial contracts (ANC)

A marriage out of community of property is achieved by drawing up an ANC. The ANC will be the most important contract that a married couple will sign in their lifetime. Entered into before marriage, the purpose of the contract is to change some or all of the automatic financial consequences of marriage.

The ANC allows the husband and wife to tailor-make their very own matrimonial property regime. They can include any provisions they like in their ANC, as long as the provisions are not against the law, good morals or the nature of marriage. ANC’s are problematic to change as they dictate the financial and proprietary consequences of the couple’s future and can affect the rights of the couple’s creditors.

Couples may enter into one of two types of ANC:

an ANC that excludes community of property, community of profit and loss, and the accrual system; or
an ANC that excludes community of property and community of profit and loss, but includes the accrual system.

The ‘accrual’ is the extent to which the husband and wife have become richer by the end of the marriage, in other words, the amount by which the spouses’ joint wealth has increased over the period of the marriage. When married according to the accrual system, each spouse acquires a certain right to the other’s property on divorce. Neither system is superior to the other. The marital property regime chosen (i.e. with or without accrual) must suit the couple’s relationship dynamic and specific needs. Note that the ANC is a normal contract, so all the rules as to fraud, duress and mistake apply.

The consequences of divorce when married out of community of property without the accrual after 1 November 1984

In a marriage out of community of property without the accrual contracted after 1 November 1984, there can be no claim for a transfer of assets. The argument is that there are now three matrimonial property regimes to choose from, and if the parties willingly decided to marry out of community of property and without the accrual system, one of the parties cannot later request a redistribution of assets. In such a regime, upon divorce, each party will retain their separate estates, i.e. what they had upon marriage and including all growth to the separate estate that occurred during the marriage, minus any losses that may have been sustained. For example, if the husband came into the marriage with R10 000, he would leave with R10 000 + profits ˗ losses.

A spouse who contributed to the other spouse’s estate, whether in cash or otherwise, will have a difficult time proving that he/she is entitled to anything from their ex’s estate on divorce as contributions play no role if the parties are married without the accrual. If, for example, the wife stays home to raise the children and does not contribute financially towards the marriage and the other spouse works and accumulates assets, the wife may find herself with nothing and no claim to her husband’s assets.

Advantages of marriage out of community of property without the accrual

Each spouse keeps his/her own assets and is free to deal with his/her own estate as he/she likes.
Spouses are generally not liable for each other’s debts. Thus, if one spouse becomes insolvent, creditors cannot touch the assets of the other spouse.
The financially stronger spouse does not have to share his/her estate with the weaker spouse. This is subject to judicial discretion and forfeiture of benefits.

Disadvantages of marriage out of community of property without the accrual

The economically weaker spouse, traditionally the woman, does not get to share in the estate of the stronger spouse, even though she may have indirectly contributed to the estate by running the household and looking after the children. This is subject to judicial discretion and forfeiture of benefits.
An ANC has to be entered into in order to marry out of community of property. This costs money, and the parties must pay the fees of a notary and costs of registration.

Marriages out of community of property with the accrual

After 1984, anyone entering into an ANC that excludes community of property and community of profit and loss is automatically married under the accrual system. Spouses may, however, exclude the accrual system in their ANC, but if they do not do so expressly, the accrual applies. When the accrual is included, a spouse will be entitled to share in the growth of the two estates at divorce.

This is surely the most appropriate and ideal way to marry. All the assets that each party owns prior to the marriage can either be excluded or included in the accrual. If no assets are excluded in the ANC, the value of each party’s estate at the commencement of the marriage is deemed to be nil.

The consequences of divorce when married out of community of property with the accrual

Accrual is a way to ensure that both spouses in a marriage gain a fair share of the estate once the marriage comes to an end. The accrual system does not apply automatically to all marriages out of community of property. For the accrual system to apply, the ANC must be drafted in a certain way. The accrual system incorporates a calculation that is applied when the marriage is dissolved by divorce. The spouses will share the assets during the course of their marriage based on a particular calculation when the marriage is terminated.

The term ‘accrual’ is used to denote the net increase in value of a spouse’s estate since the date of marriage. In other words, what was yours before the marriage remains yours, and what you have earned during the marriage belongs to both of you. Because the right to share in accrual is exercisable only upon dissolution of the marriage, such a right is not transferable and cannot be attached by creditors during the subsistence of the marriage.

The following assets are not taken into account when determining the accrual (are not included in the net value of the estate):

Any asset excluded from the accrual system under the ANC, as well as any other asset that the spouse acquired by virtue of his/her possession or former possession of such asset.
Any inheritance, legacy, trust or donation received by a spouse during the marriage from any third party, as well as any other asset that the spouse has acquired by virtue of his/her possession or former possession of the inheritance, legacy, trust or donation, unless the spouses have agreed otherwise in their ANC or the testator/trix or donor has stipulated otherwise.
Any donation between the spouses.
Any amount that accrued to a spouse by way of damages (e.g. slander), other than damages for patrimonial loss or the proceeds of an insurance policy in respect of a dread disease.

Commencement values and accruals

Where parties wish to enter into an ANC with the accrual system, they must make sure that the commencement values of their respective estates (i.e. how much their estates are worth at the time of marriage) have been verified and accepted by both parties. It often happens in divorce matters that one party will allege that the other’s commencement value was inflated or completely inaccurate.

Upon the dissolution of the marriage by divorce, the net estate value (assets less liabilities less excluded assets and/or commencement values) of each estate is determined separately. The larger estate must then transfer half of the difference to the smaller estate. Putting it another way, the smaller estate must claim for an amount equal to half of the difference between the accruals of the respective estates. The right to share in the accrual only commences upon dissolution of the marriage by divorce.

The commencement value to be subtracted from the current value of the estate must be adjusted with the consumer price index (CPI) to make provision for any change in the value of money. To calculate the adjustment, go to http://www.statssa.gov.za and click on ‘Historical CPI’ and then on ‘Key indicators’. The factor by which the commencement value must be multiplied to get to the adapted value is calculated by dividing the value for the month of the dissolution of the marriage by the value for the month in which the parties were married.

Advantages of marriage out of community of property with the accrual

The spouses share the increase in their assets accumulated during the marriage and the economically weaker spouse benefits.
The spouses do not share their assets acquired before their marriage (but only if excluded in the ANC or included in the commencement values of the parties’ estates). The accrual system appeals to people who are already wealthy at the time of marriage.
During the course of the marriage, each spouse manages his/her estate at will. There is no complex joint or equal administration.
The spouses are not liable for each other’s debts. All that they share is their net assets. Thus, if one spouse becomes insolvent, the other spouse is protected against creditors.

Disadvantages of marriage out of community of property with the accrual

The economically stronger spouse has to share the profits that he/she made during the marriage.
One has to enter into an ANC in order for the accrual system to apply.
The calculation of accrual at the end of the marriage can be a bit complex.

Compiled by Bertus Preller

Family Law and Divorce Attorney and author of Everyone’s Guide to Divorce and Separation – Random House.

Twitter: bertuspreller

Websites:  http://www.divorcelaws.co.za or http://www.divorceattorney.co.za

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/divorceattorneys

Book review on Everyone’s Guide to Divorce and Separation


Deur Jaco Barnard-Naudé is professor in regsfilosofie aan die Universiteit van Kaapstad.

Book

Ons leef vandag in ‘n wêreld van toenemende vloeibaarheid en pluraliteit op die vlak van persoonlike verhoudings. Die een dag besluit jy en jou beste vriend nog om lewenskoste te beperk deur ‘n woonstel te deel en die volgende dag word die platoniese vriendskap iets meer en julle woon voortaan saam as man en vrou. Of man en man. ‘n Paar jaar later besluit julle om te trou. As julle ‘n eendersgeslagtelike verhouding bedryf, moet julle deur die hekke van die Wet op Burgerlike Verbintenisse, 2006, toegang verkry tot die twyfelagtige groener gras van die huwelik. Heteroseksuele saamwoners het ‘n addisionele (en meer konvensionele) wet beskikbaar waarvolgens hulle in die huwelik kan tree – die Huwelikswet van die Jaar van Onse Heer 1961. As julle byvoorbeeld in Tamboerskloof saamwoon en besluit die huwelik is nie wat julle en ander eende van julle dam wil hê nie, hoef julle nie te trou om die verbintenis regtens erken te kry nie: die 2006-Wet maak voorsiening vir ‘n burgerlike vennootskap wat presies dieselfde gevolge as ‘n huwelik het.

Ek het al hierdie dinge geweet voordat ek hierdie uiters leesbare en akkurate boek onder die oë gehad het, omdat ek vir ‘n regsfakulteit werk en self betrokke was by die totstandkoming van die 2006-Wet. Vir diegene wat tans in ‘n saamwonery van een of ander aard verkeer, dit oorweeg om een of ander Groot Stap (insluitend skeiding van tafel en bed) te doen en nié in die regsberoep werk of betroubare vriende daarin (skaars spesie) het nie, kan ekEveryone’s Guide to Divorce and Separation aanbeveel.

Die titel is ondeurdag. Hoewel die regstema van geregtelike skeiding prominent daarin bespreek word, soos die titel aandui, handel groot gedeeltes daarvan oor die regsgevolge van die totstandkoming van ‘n huwelik of ander permanente saamwoonverhouding. Selfs die gevolge van die totstandkoming van die ouwêreldse “verlowing” (en wat die lô sê oor die verloofring wanneer jy dit in sy gesig terugsmyt) word met erns bespreek. En as lobola deel was van jou huweliksonderhandelinge en jy is getroud ingevolge die Wet op Erkenning van Gewoonteregtelike Huwelike, sal jy interessante dinge lees oor hoe om te verhoed dat jou man se aanhoudende trouery jou nie finansieel benadeel nie.

‘n Groot gedeelte van die boek handel oor die onwillekeurige partye tot ‘n saamwoonverhouding: die kinders. Daar is ‘n omvattende bespreking van wat die verantwoordelikhede teenoor kinders in ‘n gesin is – veral wanneer die ouers se saamwoonverhouding tot ‘n einde kom en ook in gevalle waar Ma en Pa eens saamgewoon, of ten minste saam verkeer, het, maar by geboorte van die kind reeds aanbeweeg het. Die boek stel dit in hierdie konteks direk en duidelik: die kind(ers) sit met die gebakte pere van julle mislukte verhouding sonder dat hulle daarvoor gevra het. Die allerminste wat julle kan doen, is alles in julle vermoë ten einde te verseker dat hulle so onbeskadig as moontlik uit die puin van julle verhouding tree.

Bostaande is maar een rede waarom die skrywer (‘n prokureur) daarvoor pleit dat egskeidings nie in litigasie behoort te eindig nie. Daar is merendeels slegs verloorders in ‘n bestrede egskeiding, en té dikwels, waar kinders betrokke is, is dit húlle wat as pionne in die vuilspel gebruik word en die meeste verloor.

Benewens ‘n omvattende verduideliking van die egskeidingsproses bevat die boek ook heelwat praktiese wenke vir mense wat deur so ‘n proses moet gaan (waartydens gesinsgeweld nie uitgesluit word nie, daarom die hoofstuk oor laasgenoemde). Dit het my lank geneem om die bul by die horings te pak en hierdie boek te lees, want egskeiding is nooit ‘n aangename onderwerp om oor te dink of te lees nie – ons dink veel eerder aan die feeste van die huweliksdag. Maar as jy jou in ‘n skeidingsituasie bevind (en nie in die regsberoep werk of daarin bevriend is nie), moet jy jou, soos vir enige stryd, hoe gemoedelik ook al, bewapen. En Preller se boek is ‘n sterk wapen. Kry dit.

divorce and separation

 

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Original article at: http://www.litnet.co.za/Article/2013-everyones-guide-to-divorce-and-separation-bertus-preller

Rebuilding Your Financial Life After Divorce


After Divorce Divorce

Divorce is one of the most upsetting events a person can go through. It raises emotions such as hurt, anger and distress that are hard to control, and it can take a long time to recover fully. Everyone knows how annoying and emotionally difficult divorce can be, but often we overlook the more logistical challenges of separation.

Divorce brings major adjustment to nearly every aspect of your life, including your financial stability and future goals. Without a doubt, your life will be changed. But adjusting to and even accepting the changes will help you to get back on your feet faster and more effectively. You will now be fully in control of your own financial portfolio, which involves keeping a careful eye on your income and expenses, paying your own accounts, saving for university if you have children, and planning for the savings and investments you will need to enable you to succeed.

The list of responsibilities may seem a bit intimidating at first, particularly if you were not really involved in the family finances while you were married. But by learning along the way, you will likely find that it is empowering to make your own financial decisions and to be in control of your own destiny.

Things you should do post-divorce

Draft a new will

The law gives you a three-month window period after your divorce in which it is assumed that it is your intention to disinherit your ex-spouse. If you should pass away during that time, and you had not amended your will, a court will assume that you were going to. If, however, you pass away after the three-month period and had still not amended your will, all your assets will revert to your ex-spouse.

Invest wisely

It is vital to protect your future needs by means of reinvestments. When a divorce is granted, a redistribution of assets takes place, where often one spouse will receive a lump sum or several instalments from the other. As the recipient of these funds, it is critical that you look to the future and make sensible plans that will take care of your financial needs. It is equally important that you structure any reinvestments in the most tax-effective way. There are many financial products to choose from and you need to invest wisely in order to generate an income or future growth from your capital. Make sure that you investigate the different advantages of lump-sum investments or savings plans for regular payments, whichever may apply.

Change your policy beneficiaries

It is vital that you also amend your beneficiary nominations on all of your life-assurance policies within the three-month window after divorce. After the three months, should anything happen to you, your current beneficiary nominations will stand. Not changing these may result in your ex inheriting from you years after your divorce.

Change your bank account

Open your own bank account if you had a joint account. If you had your own accounts it may be wise to change your passwords. In the event of your spouse passing away, his account will be frozen and you will not be able to access any of the funds until an executor is appointed and they agree to release funds to you as they deem appropriate.

Make a budget

Whether you were the breadwinner or a stay-at-home mother, your financial status will certainly change significantly as a result of your separation or divorce. To start rebuilding your life, you need to start with an income and expenses budget to ensure that you have a precise idea of what your new cost of living will be in future, with or without the children.

Work out a financial plan

Finding a new rich husband/wife should not be part of your financial plan. Do not rely on any new partner for financial security. Life may change in an instant and you may suddenly be faced with all the financial responsibilities once again. Make sure that you have a good understanding of your financial affairs. Develop a comprehensive financial plan. Contact your financial adviser to assist you in creating such a plan.

Manage your debt

Make sure that you have as little debt as possible post-divorce. This will guarantee that you have a good credit record. Being single again means you have a single income and therefore you need to plan your retirement carefully. If you have a bond, try to pay it off as soon as you can. Always pay surplus cash or bonuses into your bond account. This will save on interest paid over the long term and you will own your property sooner.

Manage your savings

Always have at least one extra monthly salary available for emergencies. An access payment on the insurance on your car in case of accident can easily cost R1 500 or more. If you do receive maintenance for your children, ensure that you have at least one month’s maintenance in a savings account, should your ex default by any chance.

Look at your risk portfolio

With a single income your risk in terms of liabilities almost doubles. Make certain that you have a medical aid or hospital plan. If you did not belong to a medical aid for longer than two years and you are older than 35, a late-joiner penalty may be imposed on your monthly premium and a waiting period may exist. Remember to arrange short-term insurance on your car and household contents, life cover and severe illness and disability insurance.

Decide how to invest your retirement funds

If you were awarded a portion of your spouse’s retirement fund, you have the option to either withdraw the funds from their retirement fund or to transfer the funds to your own retirement or preservation fund. If you take a withdrawal, there will be a tax implication, whereas if you transfer the funds to another approved fund, the transfer will be tax free, provided your tax affairs at SARS are in order.

Making provision for your own retirement is key. When you were married, you were either jointly involved in your retirement planning or it was something that was taken care of by your spouse. Now that you are divorced, you will need to review your plans and take sole responsibility for your own retirement.

If you are not currently a member of a pension and/or provident fund, a contribution to one of a new generation retirement annuity fund may be appropriate in the circumstances. Alternatively, you can invest in a savings plan until retirement. The capital can then be used to provide you with an income. It is always best to discuss the options you may have with your financial adviser.

If you were the main breadwinner and the retirement fund member, you stand to lose a sizable portion of your retirement fund as part of your divorce settlement, in which case you will need to make additional retirement provisions for yourself.

Secure your maintenance

See whether it is possible to secure your maintenance by a life-assurance policy in terms whereof you are the owner of the life of the maintenance payer. On claiming either disability or critical illness benefits on the life of the maintenance payer, the life-assurance company will pay the benefits in terms of the policy directly to you. In the event of the maintenance payer’s death, you as the nominated beneficiary will be paid and not the deceased’s estate. As the owner, you can also appoint a beneficiary. Ensure that you have sufficient life, disability and severe-illness cover on the life of the non-custodian parent to protect your and your children’s financial needs.

Change your marital status

Home Affairs will not register a further marriage if you are recorded as ‘married’ on the system. Take your divorce certificate to Home Affairs and ask them to amend your marital status. This normally takes three months to change.

Change your surname

A woman may revert to her maiden surname or a prior surname she legally bore, or may join her surname with that of her ex-husband’s as a double-barrelled surname. If you took your husband’s name when you got married, and it reflects that way in your ID book, then there is a process you have to go through via Home Affairs to legally revert to your maiden name.

When the mother of a child born in wedlock divorces the child’s father, and wishes to change the child’s surname to her maiden surname, to another surname she bore legally or, if she has remarried, to the surname of her new husband, the natural father’s written consent, unless waived by a competent court, is a statutory requirement.

From the book: Everyone’s Guide To Divorce And Separation, by Bertus Preller

Media interview with Divorce Law and Family Law Specialist Bertus Preller


Family Law and Divorce Law Attorney Bertus Preller
Family Law and Divorce Law Attorney Bertus Preller

Bertus Preller, was recently interviewed in connection with his book “Everyone’s Guide to Divorce and Separation” published by Random House Struik (Zebra Press – 2013). So that you can get to know Bertus better, we have included excerpts from that interview.

How long have you been involved in law?

I was admitted as an attorney in 1989 and have almost 25 years’ experience of the law.

What are some examples of the types of cases that you handle?

I represent people in divorce, both in local and international divorce cases, care and contact (custody) disputes, access (visitation) / parental disputes, parenting plans, unmarried father’s rights, paternity cases, grandparents’ rights,  step-parent and non-parent care and contact cases, international child abduction (Hague Convention) cases, relocation disputes, division of property, spousal maintenance and child maintenance matters, domestic violence and protection orders, child abuse cases, enforcement actions (where a person is seeking to enforce a court order), same-sex cases, cohabitation agreements, antenuptial agreements,  family law mediation and collaborative divorce law,  and other family law related matters. It also includes Mediation. In addition to being a litigator, I have also acted as a Mediator for many years.

Did you always want to be an attorney?

Ever since I can remember, I have always loved the idea of fighting for people who need help and helping the underdog. It was my goal, since being at high school in Grey College, to become an attorney.

How stressful is your work?

Being a family law attorney can be stressful. Our entire legal system is based on adversity and on two sides negotiating, or fighting in court, to achieve a resolution to their disputes. These negotiations, court appearances, and dealing with clients, judges and other attorneys are not exactly pleasant all the time. These relations require one to be tough, emotionally detached and sometimes even heartless. It is not fun, not glamorous and sometimes it does get ugly. The stress has a lot to do with the fact that almost everything you do is urgent and can have serious financial implications  if you mess up in court, there are going to be major implications for your client. Having said this, I love to make a difference in people’s lives, especially where children are involved.

How do you spend your day/week?

My job duties include appearing in court on behalf of clients, drafting legal documents, communicating by letter and email, conducting consultations, performing legal research, reviewing financial documents, interviewing clients, talking to attorneys, and working with psychologists, and other experts. My day is varied, with no two days being exactly alike. The largest percentage of my work-week consists of writing letters and emails, talking on the telephone, reviewing emails and correspondence, consulting with clients, drafting pleadings, reviewing financial records, and preparing for court hearings – not the kind of stuff you see on TV shows or in the movies.

Do you have celebrity clients?

Due to the nature of my work I am not able to disclose the identities of my clients, but yes, I have clients who appeared on Survivor Africa, Master Chef South Africa, actors, actresses, politicians, television personalities and some high net worth individuals.

 Do you have a “profile” of the ideal family law attorney?

In my opinion, there is no such thing as an “ideal” family law attorney. Each person has his/her own unique strengths. In appointing an attorney, I would look for someone with honesty and integrity, someone with a good work ethic, who is persuasive and communicates well, both verbally and in writing, someone who is empathetic, with excellent people-skills and a passion for helping others and practicing family law.

What is your approach to handling cases?

I believe that it is the duty of an attorney to work with his/her client as part of a team approach. Too many attorneys have a “give me the ball and I’ll run with it” philosophy, and they fail to communicate with the client during the course of the case. I take a completely different approach. After all, it is the client’s case. My job, is to communicate with my client, help determine the proper objectives, formulate a game-plan, and work hard to make sure that the client’s needs are effectively met. I understand that my client is going through what is probably the most difficult and stressful time in her/his life and need someone who will look for logical, peaceful solutions but will also be willing to aggressively fight for his/her rights if that becomes at all necessary.

Does dealing with other people’s failed relationships make you feel cynical about love at all?

I believe in marriage. It would be naive to think that dealing with divorce and separation (and all the trauma and distress that goes with it) on a daily basis, will not make one sceptical about marriage to a certain extent. I think the problem does not lie in the institution of marriage or that relationships that end in divorce were never meant to be. It is my view that the reason for many problems that we experience in relationships stems from the fact that people are fickle and that our circumstances and life experiences change and shape us every day. A healthy relationship is an evolving relationship and each partner should learn and grow through the relationship, and often through the conflicts. Marriage can be described as a series of peaks and troughs and as long as the peaks outweigh the troughs then you will be okay.

What have bad divorces taught you about what goes into a happy marriage?

There is not one universal key that unlocks the door to a happy and healthy marriage or relationship. There is a saying that a relationship is not a place where you go to take, it is a place where you go to give. Marriage for many of us will undoubtedly be the biggest financial and personal transaction of your entire life. You need to look at your partner and realize that you are not going to change him or her. Ask yourself this: “Does my partner have the basic qualities that matter to me, characteristics that are not going to change over time?” Remember that it is not all about the wedding cake, the wedding ceremony, the wedding gifts or the wedding dress. It takes a lot of work and effort to make it work. Lack of communication tops the list of the reasons for divorce. There is the cliché that women want men to know what they want and what they are thinking without ever having to tell them, but the reality is that couples need to talk and express their feelings and fears to their spouse. It is when spouses only start thinking about their own wants and needs and no longer function as a “team”, that things start to fall apart. Unfortunately in many instances our ability to learn about relationships shuts down at the point when the marriage begins to get tough and just because couples develop disagreements, I am sure that many marriages could have been saved if the couples persevered just a little more. Conflict should be seen as an inevitable part of relationships. One of the secrets to a good marriage is to find your equal partner, not a partner who is going to dominate or control you or who you can dominate or control. Any relationship  for it to work must be based on mutual respect, common purpose and of course trust. When a couple start to lose one of those ingredients, the wheels come off.

Is it possible to recover after a divorce?

Most individuals blame their ex-spouses. I think that if you can step back and say, “This is what I have done wrong and this is what I will change”, you have something powerful to teach others who go through the same issues. In many divorces, the problems that caused the divorce have existed in the relationship long before the marriage and were either not acknowledged or were ignored in the hope that marriage might heal the problems. But that is not what happens in life. Nobody can make you feel better about yourself. Someone wise once said that it takes two wholes to make a marriage, not two halves.

To find out more about Bertus Preller, visit his webpage at http://www.divorceattorney.co.za or follow him on Twitter @bertuspreller or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/divorceattorneys.

Divorce Attorney Bertus Preller Consults in Johannesburg


Family Law and Divorce Law Attorney Bertus Preller
Family Law and Divorce Law Attorney Bertus Preller

Bertus Preller  a Family, Divorce Law Attorney, Mediator at Abrahams and Gross in Cape Town, is now consulting on a weekly basis in Sandton Johannesburg. He has nearly 25 years of experience as an attorney and specializes in Family Law and Divorce Law cases across South Africa. Bertus is the author of Everyone’s Guide to Divorce and Separation, published by Random House. He has also been quoted on Family Law issues in various newspapers such as the Sunday Times and Business Times and magazines such as Noseweek, Keur, Living and Loving, Longevity, Woman and Home, Women’s Health, You, Huisgenoot and Fairlady and also appeared on the SABC television show, 3 Talk, Morning Live and on the 5FM Breakfast show with Gareth Cliff. His clients include artists, celebrities, sports people and high net worth individuals.

His areas of expertise are Divorce Law, Family Law, Divorce Mediation, Parenting Plans, Parental Responsibilities and Rights, Custody (care and contact) of children, same sex marriages, unmarried fathers rights, child abduction and Hague Convention cases and domestic violence matters and international divorce law. He will consult in Sandton every Wednesday.

 

To contact Bertus for an appointment:

+27 21 422 1323
+27 83 443 9838

Abrahams and Gross Inc.
1st Floor, 56 Shortmarket Street
Cape Town, 8000

info@divorceattorney.co.za

Web: http://www.divorceattorney.co.za

Twitter: @bertuspreller

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